Mobile apps can help those suffering from hypertension, improve communication between patients and providers

The use of physician-monitored mobile apps for tracking blood pressure can help curb the effects of chronic hypertension and improve communication between patients and providers, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. The findings are the result of a multi-year study that tracked over 1,600 patients from a private clinical […]

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Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest

Improving air quality may improve cognitive function and reduce dementia risk, according to several studies reported today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2021 in Denver and virtually. Previous reports have linked long-term air pollution exposure with accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease-related brain plaques, but this is the first accumulated evidence that reducing pollution, especially […]

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‘Mental health is health. Period.’ Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin decries stigma in message to troops

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin expressed deep concern about suicide among troops during a visit to U.S. forces stationed in Alaska, where there has been an alarming spike in those deaths. At least six soldiers have died by probable suicide in Alaska since Dec. 30, and suicide is suspected in several others, U.S. TODAY has reported. […]

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No more finger pricks: A continuous glucose monitor benefits patients with diabetes in more ways than one

A 15-center study of 175 patients with poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes in JAMA found that continuous glucose monitoring, compared to blood glucose meter monitoring, or finger pricking, significantly decreased their hemoglobin A1C over eight months (-1.1% versus -0.16%, respectively.) Although the benefits of continuous glucose monitoring for patients with diabetes has been demonstrated before, the […]

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Depression isn’t ‘crying in the corner’

Employees who experience depression are tasked with the decision to disclose their mental health to others at work. For these employees, one West Virginia University researcher found that they utilize eight strategies on how to disclose (or conceal) this often-stigmatized social identity. Kayla Follmer, assistant professor of management in the John Chambers College of Business […]

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